<![CDATA[2015 Public Art At Wake Forest - Burruss / Faltin]]>Wed, 13 Jan 2016 04:59:18 -0800Weebly<![CDATA[In Solidarity]]>Thu, 19 Nov 2015 20:54:27 GMThttp://publicart215.weebly.com/burruss--faltin/in-solidarity
1 in every 5 women will experience sexual misconduct of some kind while attending college.  1 in every 10 victims is male.  This issue has touched the lives of countless people at Wake Forest.  Everyone knows someone who has been impacted by this tragedy.  This time of year is incredibly stressful for students and faculty.  The high level of strain associated with finals creates an environment prone to emotional distress.  Living with a memory of a negative experience such as rape or sexual assault can feel particularly difficult and isolating at this time.  The clothes line emulates the art installation of Alketa Xhafa Mripa, “Thinking of You,” which was created for awareness of those affected by sexual violence during the 1998-1999 Kosovo War.  The clothes are white to reflect renewal and empowerment found in solidarity.  Amid the clothes are quilt squares bearing messages of hope and support, similar to the Monument Quilt, a massive installation made up of quilt squares designed by sexual assault survivors and their supporters.  The quilt squares bear the colors yellow, teal, and red, to reference PREPARE (Policy Group on Rape Education, Prevention, and Response), Sexual Assault Survivor Awareness, and the Monument Quilt, respectively.  The messages on each quilt square reflect re-created thoughts from survivors as well as messages of solidarity and support for these members of our community.  This piece is intended to voice love and support for those whom have been hurt through rape, sexual assault and sexual misconduct.  Wake Forest ideally is a safe place, but this is not always the case in reality, Wake should be a place of acceptance, understanding, and support.  ~Sophia Faltin

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Up-close view of "In Solidarity"
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Outside of Scales Fine Arts Center, WFU
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<![CDATA[Mother, so Dear                                 ]]>Sat, 14 Nov 2015 20:33:09 GMThttp://publicart215.weebly.com/burruss--faltin/mother-so-dear
What does it mean to be an individual? To be a part of a community? To be a part of the Wake Forest community? We all have our own talents and interests. We come from diverse backgrounds, both cultural and ethnic. These items contribute to our own unique identities and allow us to find our niche with those who share similar likes and dislikes. However, it is not uncommon that these unique niches can cause isolation within a larger group. These divisions dissuade many people, students included, from reaching out of their comfort zone and interacting with others whose interests and background may not align with their own. Through this artwork, I hope to weave a thread through the Wake Forest community – uniting students of multiple interests and bridging the gaps that divide our student body. The photographs and poetic text merge to form a piece that questions our roles as members of a community. The individuals pictured remain somewhat ambiguous, becoming more relatable to the student body as a whole. The literary emphasis invites a dialogue that has the potential to improve the student experience through an understanding that together, we form a single unit. It is our individual experiences and motivations that give our University its own distinct atmosphere and these attributes should be celebrated, allowing us to move toward an environment where each student feels a part of something greater than themselves.

Artist: Cami Burruss
Sponsor: Wake Forest University's Office of Multicultural Affairs
Where to look for it: Plinths outside of Z. Smith Reynolds Library


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